Tag Archives: electronic correspondence

Week 5: Policies for Reviewing Written Work

A tutor’s primary objective is to help a student become a better writer by the end of the semester, not to produce a perfect paper by the end of the tutoring session.

When revising work, focus on content such as ideas, phrasing, and organization.

When reviewing work focus on mechanical issues such as grammar, spelling, and formatting.

As a tutor for CU Athletics, you should comply with the following:

  • DO NOT alter the student’s voice.  This is a violation of NCAA rules.
  • DO NOT accept an emailed copy of the student’s work.  The student should provide you with a hard copy of their paper or assignment.  Tutors may not respond with corrections via email.  If a student-athlete sends their work via email, please forward it immediately to the Tutoring Director then delete it from your device.
  • NEVER write on a student’s paper.  The student should be the only person making corrections on his/her own draft copy.
  • DO NOT accept a paper dropped off for review.  Revision and review only takes place in an active tutoring session between the tutor and the student.  The student must be physically present and actively engaged.
  • ENGAGE the student when proofreading.  Students MUST be present during the proofing of their paper.  If necessary, have the student read the paper aloud or read it to the student.
  • NEVER rewrite sentences for the students.  Never edit, alter, refine or correct.  Help the student see where writing may be improved.
  • NEVER sit at the keyboard.  Only the student should work on the computer.  The student must type/write their own paper without a tutor present.  There should be NO composition taking place during tutoring sessions.
  • TEACH the student.  Improve the writer, not the individual writing.
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Week 11: Twitter and Facebook

Social networking sites, such as Twitter and Facebook, are all the rage and have been for quite some time. Naturally, as these sites have evolved into playing a greater role in our culture, they have also evolved into being used in the recruiting world. With this evolution into recruiting, questions have been raised on what NCAA rules allow to occur with these sites.

Generally, the NCAA only allows “electronic correspondence” in the forms of e-mail and faxes in terms of communicating with recruits. Therefore, coaches and staff (which includes Herbst Academic Center tutors) cannot write on “walls” of prospects, comments on their status, post comments on photographs, etc.
Also, when updating a Facebook or Twitter status, prospects cannot be singled out or named. Statuses must be kept general, rather than specific.

Since e-mail is allowed, coaches/staff can use the “inbox” function on Facebook or the direct message function on Twitter to contact recruits.

Direct any questions to Jill or Corey.

Post submitted by Mindy Sclaro