Tag Archives: tutor tips

60 Minutes

Tutoring Appointments are scheduled in 60 minute blocks of time.  Tutors should plan to use the majority of this time, working with the student(s) assigned to the session.  There are times when this may not be possible, but those instances should be the exception.

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Leading Exam Review Sessions

Student
Occasionally, some of our tutors will have an opportunity to lead exam review sessions for courses within their discipline.  These review sessions provide a different experience in the tutor/student dynamic than any of our other types of sessions. As an exam review leader, you want to systematically address the concepts that are most likely to appear on the exam while teaching the students how to solve the problems they will see.

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Writing Lab & Math Lab

Our tutoring lab format provides an opportunity for student-athletes to get tutoring support without having to commit to regular appointments.  We offer Math Lab and Writing Lab help staffed by specialists who have significant training and teaching experience in these subject areas.  Students can drop-in for assistance or setup an appointment in advance by contacting their academic coordinator or the tutoring staff.  Following are guidelines that tutors are expected to follow when working Math Lab and Writing Lab shifts.
Writing Lab Station

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Don’t Let the Madness Overtake You

Last March, while attending the Pac-12 Men’s Basketball Championship Tournament in Las Vegas, I almost got caught up in the Madness. After taking in Utah’s improbable overtime win over the Cal Bears, my wife and I were walking through the MGM Grand to meet some friends for dinner. Basketball Scoreboard at MGM 2013

As we strolled through the casino floor, still caught up in the excitement, we came upon the Sports Book when my wife exclaimed, “let’s put some money on Utah!”. Imagining the possibilities of a #10 seed advancing to the Big Dance, we got in line to throw down our wager, when all of a sudden I remembered, “I can’t do this”. For a split moment, March Madness took over my thought process and I narrowly avoided a preventable mistake.

NCAA rules prohibit all athletic department staff members and student-athletes from gambling or wagering anything of value on any NCAA sporting events. This includes any NCAA tournament games, brackets, and pools.
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Week 6: FERPA

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974

Federal law holds members of the Herbst Academic Center to strict standards of confidentiality. Any academic information that is disclosed by a student-athlete is considered to be confidential.  This includes disclosing information about student-athletes to coaches, other athletics staff, the press or any individual who is not associated with the Herbst Academic Center.  The release of this protected information is limited to the staff in the Herbst Academic Center ONLY.  Tutors, as well as the remainder of the staff, are to abide by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (also known as FERPA).  This Act deals directly with the protection of the educational records of student-athletes.

Additionally, tutors should not communicate directly with faculty members or coaches about the students they tutor.

Below are links to additional information to help you gain a better understanding of FERPA.

How do we put student data at risk?

Week 5: Policies for Reviewing Written Work

A tutor’s primary objective is to help a student become a better writer by the end of the semester, not to produce a perfect paper by the end of the tutoring session.

When revising work, focus on content such as ideas, phrasing, and organization.

When reviewing work focus on mechanical issues such as grammar, spelling, and formatting.

As a tutor for CU Athletics, you should comply with the following:

  • DO NOT alter the student’s voice.  This is a violation of NCAA rules.
  • DO NOT accept an emailed copy of the student’s work.  The student should provide you with a hard copy of their paper or assignment.  Tutors may not respond with corrections via email.  If a student-athlete sends their work via email, please forward it immediately to the Tutoring Director then delete it from your device.
  • NEVER write on a student’s paper.  The student should be the only person making corrections on his/her own draft copy.
  • DO NOT accept a paper dropped off for review.  Revision and review only takes place in an active tutoring session between the tutor and the student.  The student must be physically present and actively engaged.
  • ENGAGE the student when proofreading.  Students MUST be present during the proofing of their paper.  If necessary, have the student read the paper aloud or read it to the student.
  • NEVER rewrite sentences for the students.  Never edit, alter, refine or correct.  Help the student see where writing may be improved.
  • NEVER sit at the keyboard.  Only the student should work on the computer.  The student must type/write their own paper without a tutor present.  There should be NO composition taking place during tutoring sessions.
  • TEACH the student.  Improve the writer, not the individual writing.

Week 4: Who is a Prospect?

NCAA Rule 13.02.12 Prospective Student Athlete

A prospective student athlete (also known as “prospect” or “PSA”) is any student, regardless of athletic ability, who is in the 9th – 12th grade. Men’s basketball also includes 7th and 8th graders. These individuals will remain a prospect until one of the following occurs (whichever occurs earlier):

  1. The student registers and enrolls full-time at a four-year institution
  2. The student practices or competes at a four-year institution prior to enrolling for their first semester term
  3. The student registers and enrolls and attends summer classes prior to their initial enrollment

Tutor Interaction with Prospects

You are allowed to tutor prospects; however, you should not initiate the contact with a prospect being recruited by our institution at the request of one of our coaches or staff members. CU Athletics staff should never ask you to tutor a prospect under any circumstances.

You should charge prospects the standard rate for your services. Prospects, especially those being recruited by CU, should not receive any discounts or special deals.

The same restrictions on extra benefits for current student-athletes also applies to prospects. Do not provide prospects with extra benefits – this may include cash, meals, gifts, transportation, etc.

In your conversations with prospects, you are not allowed to talk about CU Athletics, it’s coaches or staff members in a recruiting manner. Likewise, you are not to serve as a conduit for delivering recruiting materials back-and-forth between coach and prospect (i.e. game film, correspondence, exchange of contact information).

When marketing your tutoring services to prospects in the private market:

  • You should not use the CU Athletics logo in your materials
  • You should not make any specific reference to CU Athletics
  • You not use direct quotes from prospects or current student-athletes for testimonials (it is OK to use student-athletes who have exhausted their eligibility)